Session Brainstorm

What issues, topics, and ideas do you want to hear discussed at TransparencyCamp 2014? This is your space to suggest sessions (that you either want to lead or see others lead) and to vote for your favorites. Although the majority of the schedule will still be created on site during Camp, the most popular events from this forum will become the first sessions on Day One.

Vote for your favorite session ideas now!

Voting is open until Monday, May 26th, 2014. Presenters will be notified via email if their session is pre-selected for a timeslot at TCamp.

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    Populating an Open Techpolicy Dictionary

    Submitted on 04/02 4:03 p.m. by The Governance Lab @NYU |

    At the Governance Lab @NYU, we study new ways to solve governance issues using advances in science and technology, and test novel approaches within real-world institutions. In our work in the field of information communications technology (ICT) policy, we’ve noticed there are major barriers to progress that exist because of differences in the jargon and terminology used by technologists versus policymakers. While policymakers often lack an in-depth understand of technological processes and infrastructure informing policy, technologists are often unaware of the laws, regulations and other governance structures governing communications technologies.

    In an effort to shine more light on the field, ... READ MORE

  • 10
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    Using open data to enable better philanthropy and international aid

    Submitted on 03/15 12:55 p.m. by Michael Lenczner |

    Data about the non-profit sector is a key resource for grant-makers. As the availability of open charity data looms on the horizon, come listen to exotic Canadians (www.poweredbydata.org) tell wondrous tales of how they use open data to help funders. Participants will explore future applications of linking 990 tax returns, international aid data, government spending data, incorporation data, and non-profits’ digital footprints.

    READ MORE

  • 10
    1

    #OpenGovNow: Innovations on gathering citizen feedback

    Submitted on 03/31 6:42 p.m. by Felipe Estefan |

    Citizen feedback is a key component of open government and open development. Emerging tools and approaches are allowing us to be smarter and more effective about gathering citizen-generated data in real time. Using the example of the Global Opening Government Survey, conducted using the "Random Domain Intercept Technology", as the starting point, the session will seek to explore the value of gathering citizen feedback and will allow for exchanges on innovative methods and tools to do so. Participants will also be able to work together to identify areas where citizen feedback could add the most value, while also sharing potential ... READ MORE

  • 8
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    Open Data Rocks! Now How Can We Make Data.gov More Useful

    Submitted on 02/25 7:45 a.m. by Jeanne Holm |

    You love open data, but you don't love how hard it is to find and use. Come make it easier! Brainstorm new ways to improve access to U.S. data via Data.gov and we'll track your ideas in Github as we go.

    READ MORE

  • 7
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    Opening Government with Human-Centered Design

    Submitted on 02/24 3:33 p.m. by Dan Drinkard |

    Human-centered design is a process and set of techniques for finding solutions to problems that the people we're designing for actually have. Let's discuss how actually talking to real people can inform the decisions we make as open government advocates.

    READ MORE

  • 7
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    Data Visualization: The good, the bad, and the misleading

    Submitted on 02/24 3:46 p.m. by Ben Chartoff |

    We'll take a look at some data visualization and infographics with a critical eye. Find out what makes a visual effective or deceptive. See some common missteps, as well as some best practices.

    READ MORE

  • 5
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    Open Local Government Financial Data: Standardized and Machine Readable

    Submitted on 03/28 5:13 p.m. by Marc Joffe |

    Cities, counties and other local governments publish audited annual reports listing revenues, expenses and debts. Unfortunately, this data is typically reported in PDF form and not fully aggregated on a publicly-available platform. As a result it is difficult to compare government financial performance and identify the next Detroit before it happens. Thanks in part to a Sunlight Foundation OpenGov grant, we have put many of these financial statements for California local governments on line at http://www.publicsectorcredit.org/ca. We have also scraped some key data points and calculated credit risk scores for each government. Let's discuss how this effort can ... READ MORE

  • 5
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    Giving a Voice to Citizen Scientists

    Submitted on 02/25 7:41 a.m. by Jeanne Holm |

    Citizen scientists play a big role in gathering data ranging from identifying near-Earth asteroids to spotting rare birds. Learn more about how citizen science is changing the equation and then discuss... How should this data be made accessible? Should it be integrated with data from government and academic scientists?

    READ MORE

  • 3
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    Who is Benefitting from Open Data and How?

    Submitted on 04/19 8:03 a.m. by Samuel Lee, Sandra Moscoso, Antonio Moneo |

    We want to keep this session true to the “unconferencey” spirit of Transparency Camp. We won’t be making any presentations. The use of Open Data/Gov/Dev cliches will be frowned upon (in a good-natured way!). We want to have an engaged discussion about how open data is being used- and if ideas have scaled, how they have been adapted or applied to different settings, and what types of uses seem to stick.

    The World Bank Open Finances and Inter-American Development Bank Knowledge & Learning teams are currently collecting examples of open data use (http://bit.ly/OpenDataOps), and we plan to include ... READ MORE

  • 4
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    Hacking the Hackathon

    Submitted on 03/26 4:05 p.m. by Shauna Gordon-McKeon |

    Hackathons and other in-person events like project nights and sprints can help build community, as well as tools and solutions. Poorly planned events, however, build nothing. A brief talk by the author of "Hacking the Hackathon" (http://www.shaunagm.net/blog/2013/10/hacking-the-hackathon/) and "The In-Person Events Handbook" (http://opensource-events.com/) will be followed by a discussion of the following questions: How can we support more diverse attendance at events? How can we better measure effectiveness? How can we keep projects and communities going after events?

    READ MORE

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